Webinar Descriptions, Trainers & their Bio’s

Webinar  Training Solutions for the Homeless Sector

Webinar Descriptions

Strong case planning skills can help front-line staff and outreach teams effectively break the cycle of entrenched homelessness by learning how to move their clients into a continuum of services.  Shelter Net BC’s Introduction to Case Planning webinar is a valuable training tool that introduces the basic principles of the case planning process.  Shelter Net BC’s Introduction to Case Planning webinar explains how a front-line worker, or outreach team, can incorporate effective case planning techniques into their decision-making when working with challenging clients that seem resistant to change.

 Katherine Aubrey has over 20 years of experience working with people who have faced trauma, addictions, homelessness and/or mental illness.   Her varied, front-line work experience ranges from in-reach prison work, group therapy, parole supervision and addictions and mental health counseling.  She also has experience working with both victims and perpetrators of violence.  Some of her past and current employers include Correctional Service Canada, Long-term Inmates Now in the Community, Aurora Centre/Residential Addictions Treatment for Women, KlaHowEya, Metis Nation and numerous non-profit organizations.  She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology and Psychology and a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology with specialization in Mental Health Counseling.  She also completed a Cross-Cultural Facilitation Skills Intensive for Diversity Trainers in Berkley, California

Shelter Net BC’s more advanced Case Planning II webinar teaches participants how to complete the required paperwork for BC Housing (Case Planning Forms).  Further, this webinar reviews the purpose of each form and how best to approach completing these documents to ensure they become effective tools that drives the case planning process.  The second half of Shelter Net BC’s Case Planning II webinar explores the ethics of case planning.  Client autonomy, informed consent, impartiality and duty of care are ethical frameworks that are explored in this interactive, webinar learning experience.

 Katherine Aubrey has over 20 years of experience working with people who have faced trauma, addictions, homelessness and/or mental illness.   Her varied, front-line work experience ranges from in-reach prison work, group therapy, parole supervision and addictions and mental health counseling.  She also has experience working with both victims and perpetrators of violence.  Some of her past and current employers include Correctional Service Canada, Long-term Inmates Now in the Community, Aurora Centre/Residential Addictions Treatment for Women, KlaHowEya, Metis Nation and numerous non-profit organizations.  She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology and Psychology and a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology with specialization in Mental Health Counseling.  She also completed a Cross-Cultural Facilitation Skills Intensive for Diversity Trainers in Berkley, California

Shelter Net BC’s Cross Cultural Awareness webinar explores: What is culture?  What culture do I come from?  How does cultural understanding help me to be more effective in my work with people that are different from me? Shelter Net BC’s Cross Cultural Awareness webinar helps participants identify various tools they can use to understand people from other cultures.  Examples of common cultural misunderstandings are discussed. This Cross Cultural Awareness webinar has a question and answer period so participants can have their questions answered in real time.

Katherine Aubrey has over 20 years of experience working with people who have faced trauma, addictions, homelessness and/or mental illness.   Her varied, front-line work experience ranges from in-reach prison work, group therapy, parole supervision and addictions and mental health counseling.  She also has experience working with both victims and perpetrators of violence.  Some of her past and current employers include Correctional Service Canada, Long-term Inmates Now in the Community, Aurora Centre/Residential Addictions Treatment for Women, KlaHowEya, Metis Nation and numerous non-profit organizations.  She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology and Psychology and a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology with specialization in Mental Health Counseling.  She also completed a Cross-Cultural Facilitation Skills Intensive for Diversity Trainers in Berkley, California

Everyone should have equitable access to shelter, food and safety when they are in need. However, research shows that for transgender individuals, this is often not the case. Most service providers have not had the opportunity to learn about issues working with transgender individuals accessing their services. Yet these populations are at heightened risk of homelessness, poverty, mental/physical health and/or substance use problems, violence and face additional barriers to accessing services. These sessions, facilitated by Vancouver Coastal Health’s PRISM program, will address ways to make your shelter and housing programs more inclusive and welcoming to transgender individuals. During this training you will explore: definitions and key concepts, social factors for transgender people, unique challenges and barriers to housing, and practical strategies to make your program more inclusive.

Do you feel like you don’t have enough time to accomplish what is important to you? This training examines the work-life balance challenges facing many employees in today’s word and the signs of burnout that can begin to show up.  The intention of this webinar is to offer some practical knowledge, tips and strategies to help front-line workers to feel more empowered to begin to shift the imbalance they may be experiencing. 

Katherine Aubrey has over 20 years of experience working with people who have faced trauma, addictions, homelessness and/or mental illness.   Her varied, front-line work experience ranges from in-reach prison work, group therapy, parole supervision and addictions and mental health counseling.  She also has experience working with both victims and perpetrators of violence.  Some of her past and current employers include Correctional Service Canada, Long-term Inmates Now in the Community, Aurora Centre/Residential Addictions Treatment for Women, KlaHowEya, Metis Nation and numerous non-profit organizations.  She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology and Psychology and a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology with specialization in Mental Health Counseling.  She also completed a Cross-Cultural Facilitation Skills Intensive for Diversity Trainers in Berkley, California

  

Shelter Net BC’s Trauma in the Homeless Sector webinar offers a compelling look into the science of trauma and how service providers can effectively respond to clients and co-workers that may be affected by trauma.  Participants learn best practices for trauma-informed practices and how they can help individuals affected by trauma.  Shelter Net BC’s Trauma in the Homeless Sector webinar provides opportunities for participants to ask questions as well as contribute to surveys and discussions.

 Katherine Aubrey has over 20 years of experience working with people who have faced trauma, addictions, homelessness and/or mental illness.   Her varied, front-line work experience ranges from in-reach prison work, group therapy, parole supervision and addictions and mental health counseling.  She also has experience working with both victims and perpetrators of violence.  Some of her past and current employers include Correctional Service Canada, Long-term Inmates Now in the Community, Aurora Centre/Residential Addictions Treatment for Women, KlaHowEya, Metis Nation and numerous non-profit organizations.  She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology and Psychology and a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology with specialization in Mental Health Counseling.  She also completed a Cross-Cultural Facilitation Skills Intensive for Diversity Trainers in Berkley, California

Shelter Net BC’s Effective Workplace Boundaries for the Homeless Sector webinar reviews the importance and purpose of workplace boundaries when providing services to homeless and at-risk populations.  The challenges of setting and maintaining effective workplace boundaries are explored and specific boundary issues such as; personal disclosure of information to clients from staff, client-staff relationships outside of work, dual relationships, gift-giving and gift-receiving, and conflicts of interest are discussed.  Shelter Net BC’s Effective Workplace Boundaries for the Homeless Sector webinar is an interactive learning experience where participants are encouraged to ask questions.

Katherine Aubrey has over 20 years of experience working with people who have faced trauma, addictions, homelessness and/or mental illness.   Her varied, front-line work experience ranges from in-reach prison work, group therapy, parole supervision and addictions and mental health counseling.  She also has experience working with both victims and perpetrators of violence.  Some of her past and current employers include Correctional Service Canada, Long-term Inmates Now in the Community, Aurora Centre/Residential Addictions Treatment for Women, KlaHowEya, Metis Nation and numerous non-profit organizations.  She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology and Psychology and a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology with specialization in Mental Health Counseling.  She also completed a Cross-Cultural Facilitators Skills Intensive for Diversity Trainers in Berkley, California

Shelter Net BC’s Managing for Improved Performance webinar outlines the steps managers can take to effectively manage staff to improve employee performance.  Special sections on absenteeism and problematic employee behaviour are explored with tips on documentation and ways managers can affect positive change in the workplace.  Shelter Net BC’s Managing for Improved Performance webinar is geared for those in management and supervisory positions and is suitable for both union and non-union employers.

Marsha Goldford is a chartered professional in Human resources, currently employed with Developmental Disabilities Association (DDA) as their Director of Training and Development.

Marsha has a Master’s in Public Administration from Queen’s University, and a Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management from Royal Roads University.  

Marsha is also an active community volunteer serving as a director on housing boards and as a mentor with the BC Human Resources Management Association and Dress for Success Professional Women’s Group

 

Shelter Net BC’s Suicide Risk Factor Checklist webinar discusses how to use the suicide prevention checklist for providing information to local mental health providers, hospitals, and health authorities.  Shelter Net BC’s Suicide Risk Factor Checklist webinar teaches participants how to transfer pertinent information that mental health workers can use to engage vulnerable and at-risk populations.  The Suicide Risk Factor Checklist Tool is not intended to replace a qualified mental health assessment. Rather, Shelter Net BC’s Suicide Risk Factor Checklist webinar is an interactive learning experience that can help participants effectively address risk factors in a supportive environment.

Peter Fedos has worked in co-ed emergency residential services for 35 years. He started working in the Emergency Shelter sector in 1984. He has experience working with people in emergency shelters serving infants 48 hours old, teens that were wards of the state and seniors 90+. Peter gained knowledge working front line in shelters and as a program supervisor. Peter worked emergency residential services in BC and Australia. He also managed a street youth outreach team in the St Kilda area of Melbourne, Australia.  Peter began working working with an adult homeless population  in 1993. For the past 28 years he has worked as a Emergency Shelter program manager. Peter manages two shelters (35 beds and 10 beds), 20 transitional housing units and a mobile street outreach team.  Peter has a Bachelor’s of Adult Education from the University of Fraser Valley (UFV). He is working on a combined Master’s of Adult Education and Community Development from St Francis Xavier University,(STFX) NS

Sadly, the shelter sector is responding to a growing number of seniors that are accessing homeless services. Working with elderly clients in the homeless sector can be challenging due to the complex needs of these vulnerable clients. Shelter Net BC’s Working with Elderly Shelter Clients webinar examines health issues and how the effects of aging impact elderly shelter clients.  Shelter Net BC’s Working with Elderly Shelter Clients webinar examines specific areas for front-line, outreach and case planner workers to consider when engaging elderly clients.  This interactive webinar introduces techniques that can be help,ful when trying to create safe, respectful spaces for elderly clients.

Peter Fedos has worked in co-ed emergency residential services for 35 years. He started working in the Emergency Shelter sector in 1984. He has experience working with people in emergency shelters serving infants 48 hours old, teens that were wards of the state and seniors 90+. Peter gained knowledge working front line in shelters and as a program supervisor. Peter worked emergency residential services in BC and Australia. He also managed a street youth outreach team in the St Kilda area of Melbourne, Australia.  Peter began working working with an adult homeless population  in 1993. For the past 28 years he has worked as a Emergency Shelter program manager. Peter manages two shelters (35 beds and 10 beds), 20 transitional housing units and a mobile street outreach team.  Peter has a Bachelor’s of Adult Education from the University of Fraser Valley (UFV). He is working on a combined Master’s of Adult Education and Community Development from St Francis Xavier University,(STFX) NS

Document creation and writing are essential skills used when working with clients that access shelters, outreach teams, case planners and service providers.  Shelter Net BC’s Effective Document and Report Writing webinar teaches participants the basic techniques and practices of clearly written client and agency documents.  Participants will learn the basics of how to create written documents that transfer information effectively to shift supervisors, case managers, and agency, in a fun, interactive and supportive environment.

Peter Fedos has worked in co-ed emergency residential services for 35 years. He started working in the Emergency Shelter sector in 1984. He has experience working with people in emergency shelters serving infants 48 hours old, teens that were wards of the state and seniors 90+. Peter gained knowledge working front line in shelters and as a program supervisor. Peter worked emergency residential services in BC and Australia. He also managed a street youth outreach team in the St Kilda area of Melbourne, Australia.  Peter began working working with an adult homeless population  in 1993. For the past 28 years he has worked as a Emergency Shelter program manager. Peter manages two shelters (35 beds and 10 beds), 20 transitional housing units and a mobile street outreach team.  Peter has a Bachelor’s of Adult Education from the University of Fraser Valley (UFV). He is working on a combined Master’s of Adult Education and Community Development from St Francis Xavier University,(STFX) NS

Want to know more about how residential tenancy dispute resolution works and how to be an effective advocate in the process? Join Shelter Net BC for a one-hour, informative webinar learning experience that teaches the skills you will need to present your case more effectively.  Presented in partnership with TRAC.

Andrew Sakamoto started at TRAC in 2010, ED of TRAC since 2013, on the Vancouver Renters Advisory Committee and a PovNet board of director and serves on the Residential Tenancy Branch Operational Stakeholders Committee.  Has always worked in the nonprofit sector.  SFU grad with a communication degree.  Big sports fan.

 

Evictions – What you Should Know webinar helps front-line staff, outreach workers and service providers prevent evictions when their clients; repeatedly pay their rent late, have a landlord that is redeveloping a property, or breach the tenancy agreement.  The Evictions – What you Should Know webinar will help participants learn the process for evictions, timelines for dispute resolution, and what can be done to advocate for a client facing an eviction.  Presented in partnership with TRAC.

Andrew Sakamoto started at TRAC in 2010, ED of TRAC since 2013, on the Vancouver Renters Advisory Committee and a PovNet board of director and serves on the Residential Tenancy Branch Operational Stakeholders Committee.  Has always worked in the nonprofit sector.  SFU grad with a communication degree.  Big sports fan.

 

A fixed-term tenancy – often referred to as a “lease” – is a legal contract.  How much compensation does a tenant owe their landlord for breaking a lease?   Are there times when a tenant is legally allowed to break their lease?  What are some alternatives to lease-breaking?  This webinar will teach participants the rights and responsibilities of tenants and landlords when signing fixed-term tenancies, or “leases”.

Andrew Sakamoto started at TRAC in 2010, ED of TRAC since 2013, on the Vancouver Renters Advisory Committee and a PovNet board of director and serves on the Residential Tenancy Branch Operational Stakeholders Committee.  Has always worked in the nonprofit sector.  SFU grad with a communication degree.  Big sports fan.

 

Bed bugs are everywhere, from the Downtown Eastside, to the West End, and everywhere in between. So how do you avoid bed bugs, spot bed bugs, and treat bed bugs? Can landlords evict tenants for bringing bed bugs into a rental unit? Can tenants end their tenancy if they find bed bugs? These are just some of the complicated questions that this webinar will explore.

Andrew Sakamoto started at TRAC in 2010, ED of TRAC since 2013, on the Vancouver Renters Advisory Committee and a PovNet board of director and serves on the Residential Tenancy Branch Operational Stakeholders Committee.  Has always worked in the nonprofit sector.  SFU grad with a communication degree.  Big sports fan.

 

NEW Webinars: 2016 – 2018

Most of BC’s purpose-built rental housing is aging and in need of ongoing maintenance.  According to the Residential Tenancy Act, tenants have a right to live in rental housing that is “suitable for occupation”.  How do you ask for your landlord to make repairs?  What’s the difference between routine maintenance.

Andrew Sakamoto started at TRAC in 2010, ED of TRAC since 2013, on the Vancouver Renters Advisory Committee and a PovNet board of director and serves on the Residential Tenancy Branch Operational Stakeholders Committee.  Has always worked in the nonprofit sector.  SFU grad with a communication degree.  Big sports fan.

 

Residential Tenancy Law 101 webinar reviews the basic principles of residential tenancy law.  This Residential Tenancy Law 101 webinar is a learning opportunity that provides participants with specific information about residential security deposits, lease obligations and condition inspection reports.  This webinar’s question and answer period will provide participants with opportunities to ask specific questions about tenancy rights as they pertain to their clients.  Presented in partnership with TRAC.

Andrew Sakamoto started at TRAC in 2010, ED of TRAC since 2013, on the Vancouver Renters Advisory Committee and a PovNet board of director and serves on the Residential Tenancy Branch Operational Stakeholders Committee.  Has always worked in the nonprofit sector.  SFU grad with a communication degree.  Big sports fan.

 

PRESENT & ACCOUNTED FOR:  ATTENDANCE MANAGEMENT 101

Start with an aging workforce.  Add to that, the emergence of a younger generation that is redefining the workplace and the advent of technology tools that promote virtual vs. physical presence and voila! you have your challenges laid out for you.  How do you effectively create and manage your Society’s needs for regular, scheduled, in-person attendance by your employees?  This workshop offers a primer for people managers at all levels complete with policies, programs, tools and techniques, on how to encourage ‘presenteeism’ and how to address fault and no-fault absenteeism if and when it becomes problematic for your organization.

Marsha Goldford is a chartered professional in Human resources, currently employed with Developmental Disabilities Association (DDA) as their Director of Training and Development.

Marsha has a Master’s in Public Administration from Queen’s University, and a Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management from Royal Roads University.  

Marsha is also an active community volunteer serving as a director on housing boards and as a mentor with the BC Human Resources Management Association and Dress for Success Professional Women’s Group

 

With the prospect of four plus generations in today’s workforce, never before has managing diverse work styles, preferences and expectations been more challenging. What does it take to secure and inspire talent to get the job done? How do you find that ‘middle ground’ that engages and challenges younger workers without discarding tried and true established ways of doing business? How do you get your less tech-savvy employees to warm to new approaches? This session will take a closer look at generational differences and examine tools and techniques for attracting and keeping the best fit for your organization and for motivating your employees to be present, productive and professional in performing their jobs.

Marsha Goldford is a chartered professional in Human resources, currently employed with Developmental Disabilities Association (DDA) as their Director of Training and Development.

Marsha has a Master’s in Public Administration from Queen’s University, and a Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management from Royal Roads University.  

Marsha is also an active community volunteer serving as a director on housing boards and as a mentor with the BC Human Resources Management Association and Dress for Success Professional Women’s Group

 

This training covers how to work with landlords successfully to find market rentals for hard to house clients, and includes many real-life examples to help clients find the right housing.

Alynn Gausvic was the Manager for the Homeless Outreach Program at the Progressive Housing Society in Burnaby. Her primary task was to manage the program, the staff and to build community partnerships in order to help clients find and maintain permanent housing.  Over the years, Alynn has helped to house hundreds of people coming out of homelessness.

She also worked as the supervisor for the Floating Outreach Program at Inn from the Cold in Calgary after finishing her Master’s Degree in Social work.

Currently, Alynn is in Los Angeles, one of the few places in the world with a higher cost of living than Vancouver, where she is the director for LA Family Housing

 

Working in a rural setting provides a unique opportunity for community partnership, support and collaboration.  However, it can be challenging with it’s lack of resources, services and potential for burnout.  Dr. Dave Manley works and lives his life in the tiny, isolated community of Consul, in the SW corner of the Province of Saskatchewan.  He will be sharing what it is like to do work and ministry in a rural setting, sharing wisdom and ideas from his neck of the prairies.

Dave Manley works and lives his life in the tiny, isolated community of Consul, in the SW corner of the Province of Saskatchewan.  He likes to tell people that Consul is centrally located; 5 hrs from Calgary, 5 hrs from Saskatoon and 5 hrs from Great Falls, Montana.  He is a career pastor, presently serving for the past twenty–two years at the Church of God in Consul.  Dave has a number of roles in his community.  Volunteer firefighter, ambulance attendant and emergency medical responder, critical incident stress debriefing, board of directors and founder of Living Hope Ranch (helping at risk teenage girls facing life controlling issues).

Seven years ago, Dave and his wife Vicki built a bakery in the tiny town, as an experiment in community development.  The bakery has since added a restaurant, and today boasts as having the best burgers and cinnamon buns in the world!  Dave likes rural life, wood fired pizza, grandchildren and humans!  

 

Homelessness due to eviction is the most serious issue a tenant can face.  Did you know that if a tenant is even one day late paying rent they can be issued a 10 Day Eviction Notice for Non-Payment of Rent?  This webinar teaches participants some strategies on how to communicate and negotiate effectively with landlords in order to save their rental housing.

Andrew Sakamoto started at TRAC in 2010, ED of TRAC since 2013, on the Vancouver Renters Advisory Committee and a PovNet board of director and serves on the Residential Tenancy Branch Operational Stakeholders Committee.  Has always worked in the nonprofit sector.  SFU grad with a communication degree.  Big sports fan.

 

Do you live in a community with a low vacancy rate?  You’re not alone!  This webinar provides both practical and legal information on how to find rental housing and safely enter into a tenancy. Topics include budgets, credit checks, references, cover letters, smoking, roommates, pets, discrimination, rental applications, tenancy agreements, condition inspection reports and deposits.

Andrew Sakamoto started at TRAC in 2010, ED of TRAC since 2013, on the Vancouver Renters Advisory Committee and a PovNet board of director and serves on the Residential Tenancy Branch Operational Stakeholders Committee.  Has always worked in the nonprofit sector.  SFU grad with a communication degree.  Big sports fan.

 

DJ Larkin is a lawyer and campaigner with the Pivot Legal Society, a human rights organization grounded in Vancouver’s Downtown East-side that works on behalf of marginalized communities to create a just, fair and equal society through litigation, law reform, research and legal education.
DJ’s work focuses on litigating and researching the criminalization of homelessness, systems of housing that infringe on the human rights of low-income renters, and housing policies and practices that put marginalized tenants at risk. She recently represented the BC/Yukon Association of Drug War Survivors against the City of Abbotsford in Abbotsford v Shantz, the Supreme Court of B.C. trial that recognized the rights of vulnerable homeless people to take shelter in public spaces in the absence of safe alternatives.

According to the 2013 State of Homelessness in Canada report, the number of families requiring emergency shelter services in Canada continues to increase. Most shelter systems are not suited to meet the needs of this complex population which causes families to move between cars, campgrounds and friends’ homes. This webinar for front line staff will review recent homelessness trends and discuss best-practices for responding to families experiencing homelessness.

Jodi Sturge is a Social Planner with the City of Vancouver’s Housing Policy and Project team. She has diverse experience developing, implementing and evaluating homelessness initiatives in the non-profit, government and academic sectors. Prior to coming to the City of Vancouver, Jodi was the Deputy Executive Director of Lookout Emergency Aid Society.

 

The latest research on drug use, the effects on behaviour and skills to help as you support clients with addictions. Apply questioning and exploration to understanding, learning about the physiological effects of certain drugs.

Shaari McKenzie-Ramsay graduated from UBC as a Registered Nurse in 2015. She works at Lions Gate Hospital as an emergency nurse. Prior to this she was working in Mental Health and Addictions at the Hope Centre (acute psychiatry) and Magnolia House, a mental health transition house. She recently completed a Forensic Nurse Examiner course in Trauma in Health Care through BCIT and is a Take Home Naloxown program educator. 

Shari is co-owner of Spiritus Wilderness Medical Training, since 2001, and has been teaching injury prevention since 1992. Shari is passionate about trauma informed care in health care and in a community setting.

Peter Ramsay graduated from UBC as a Registered Nurse in 2009. He has dual specialties in emergency nursing and critical care nursing (BCIT – 2010 and 2015 respectively) and is at Lions Gate Hospital, previously in the Emergency Department and the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).  Now he is the Patient Care Supervisor for the hospital.

Amanda Thiessen specializes in helping individuals and organizations manage workplace stresses and make positive changes.

As a ‘Stress Strategist,’ Amanda works with individuals through the process of inquiry to support people in gaining clarity and finding solutions to challenges. She offers a range of workshops to organizations to facilitate the creation of safe, supportive, and positive work environments.

Having worked for over 15 years in the non-profit world, she has firsthand knowledge of the kinds of experiences that exemplify working in front-line capacities. Her experience includes working in the areas of addiction, victim services, mental health and developmental disabilities.

Although Amanda has a BA in Psychology, a Bachelors of Social Work and a MA in Theology, her greatest accomplishments remain being a loving partner, a devoted mother, and a good friend.